Monthly Archives: May 2017

Art as digital counterpractice

http://ctheory.net/ctheory_wp/art-as-digital-counterpractice/#_ednref46
Excellent article that puts in evidence so much that is hidden in the digital hype. It’s an excellent critique of all that which most of the time stays hidden in the background shadowed by discourse of the bigger structure that use technology for their efficiencies and administrative agenda but not for improving students digital agency.

It brings me to think how dangerous it is to think that students are READYMADE for techonology, making us sometimes​ forget how anxious many of them are about the digital and how helpless they feel towards a format -the digital and it’s tools and concomitant skills,  they feel they can’t master. Many times, although they are as young as 20, they feel they are the forgotten generation!! No one has taught them how to operate digital tools to study! 

This quote is taken from the article and it illustrates a bit of this in a different context.

“Through their engagement the audience might become something other than “readymade” for technology—they too can entertain what a counterpractice in the digital space might look like.”

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“Global EdTech Landscape 1.0”

“Global EdTech Landscape 1.0” @patrickbrothers https://blog.navitasventures.com/global-edtech-landscape-1-0-28e69944d33d

Christmas Trilogy 2013 Part I: The Other Isaac [1].

Barrow and Newton! Putting Barrow in its place 🙂

The Renaissance Mathematicus

In a recent post on John Wallis I commented on seventeenth century English mathematicians who have been largely lost to history, obscured by the vast shadow cast by Isaac Newton. One person, who has suffered this fate, possibly more than any other, was the first Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, and thus Newton’s predecessor on that chair, Isaac Barrow (1630 – 1677), who in popular history has been reduced to a mere footnote in the Newton mythology.

Statue of Isaac Barrow in the Chapel of Trinity College Statue of Isaac Barrow in the Chapel of Trinity College

He was born in London in 1630 the son of John Barrow a draper. The Barrow’s were a Cambridge family notable for its many prominent scholars and theologians. Isaac father was the exception in that he had gone into trade but he was keen that his son should follow the family tradition and become a scholar.  With this aim in view the young…

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