Monthly Archives: March 2014

PKP is an interesting webpage where to find open courses for researcher in early years. How to write?  How to publish? How to be an editor or a reviewer?

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Reflective Writing

Notes from: Reflective `Writing from: Kate Williams, Mary Woolliams and Jane Spiro

Longer critical review

THE FULL REFERENCE

 

Summarise                          

What it is about?

25% length

  •   The author’s purpose, aim or question
  •   Main argument, central idea, findings conclusions
  •   What sort of text is it? General, specific

Evaluate

What do I think about it?

50%

  • Who is it written for?
  • Points of interest
  • Simmilarities or differences with other texts I have read
  • Weaknesses or limitations

Reflect

How might I use it?

25%

  • Has the text helped you understand something better? Or see/do something differently? What? How was it useful?

What?

Keep this short. Give enough context so the reader knows what comes next

Outline the situation

Consider you include: actions, consequences, responses, feelings and problems

What?

Keep this short. Give enough context so the reader knows what comes next.

Outline the situation

Consider you include: actions, consequences, responses, feelings and problems

So What?

Tho most substantial part

Make the link between your personal experience and the knowledge + experience of others

 

 

 

Discuss what you have learnt

Examine about: yourself, relatinss, others, attitudes, practice, understanding. Show what is important

Now What?

Short section- next steps

Identify the implications

What impact could have these ideas in your work, practice? Or thinking? What do you need to improve future outcomes?

Complexity in learning environments

Complexity in Learning Environments

A book to read!

Joost Lowyck is a researcher that had focused his work on the design of learning environments and all the factors regarding this issue. Interesting observations like assumptions designers make that could, sometimes lead to unsuccessful environments.
Via Learning Change

My Rich Multimedia Empty DynamicSpace

cropped-rme_dspace.jpg

Testing spaces in order to choose the best option for me to study calculus and its history

Take a look and contribute if you like

A New Culture of Learning

Some notes on

A new culture of learning:

  • A big issue for me is to really understand what is the digital culture and more than that the meaning of the knowledge society and if I can relate it to the learning of math
  • I like the idea of the fluid infrastructure of the 21st century
  • Technology is constantly creating and responding to change
  • Learning takes place with out books, teachers and classrooms. There are important but there are only one part of the resources to learn. Nowadays the resources created in class are a very important part of learning. Young students are part of ‘participatory culture’ (Jenkins) so participating is core.
  • Learning can be messy, playful, creative, chaotic, not ready jet, all that with some kind of structure. How to structure the messy???
  • Collective play is not mere preparation for life, it is life.
  • Questions are more important than answer, because answers to real questions lead to more questions. Lani Watsons’ research (here the video) is about the value of questioning in education. She argues that questioning is related with the intellectual virtue of inquisitiveness which plays an invaluable role in our intellectual lives.  She will propose the importance of a question oriented education. I said in my introduction of my first proposal that questioning is how kids start to discover the world, it is the natural way they find to discover, so it has to be incorparated somehow into the learning practice. It is difficult because of the demands for a teacher working with questions that are unknown. It needs a strategy for making it possible. There was an idea of a mail box that can be filled so and so many days before the class… Sahana Murti can be asked.
  • Philosopher ask in order to get to the nature of reality. To what will pupils go when questioning in a math class? Questions are tools to understand the problem s them selfs. The value of questioning is overlooked. Students receive answers with out even making any question. There must be dedicated time in teaching students the value of good questioning strategies and how can they be developed.
  • Think about the nature of questions.
  • Think of the capacity of wonder that all humans being have (Book the wondering brain, a read?)
  • This new culture of learning can augment learning in all its facets

Connected Minds

 

bombillo_CespedConnected Minds. Technology and today’s learners

With this report the Center for Research and Innovation CERI provides a coherent and comprehensive answer to 3 questions:

  1. Can the claim that today’s learners are New Millennium learners or digital natives, be sustained empirically?
  2. Is there consistent research evidence demonstrating the effects of technology adoption on cognitive development, social values, and learning expectations?
  3. What are the implications for educational policies and practice?

Making an interesting contribution to the ongoing debate of the effects of technology attachment and connectedness in learners, particularly concerning their expectations regarding teaching.

One of the findings shows that students don’t want technology to bring a radical change in teaching and learning but would like to benefit more from their added convenience and increased productivity gains in academic word. If those gains do not become apparent to students then reluctance emerges. That maybe related to the uncertainty, disruptiveness and discomfort that discrete technology-based not clearly leading to learning improvements may cause to them

Read more…

 

Cognition in practice: mind, mathematics, and culture in everyday life

To read!

Personal Learning Environment Assignment and Reflections

Personal learning environment: Different views from the making

User Generated Education

I teach a graduate course for the Boise State University’s Educational Technology program called Social Networked Learning.  I discussed it in Educators as Social Networked Learners and Educator as a Social Networked Learner: Presentation Materials.

One of the assignments later in the course is creating a diagram of one’s personal learning environment.  Some previous activities students completed prior to this assignment include: joining Twitter, using Facebook for our class communities, following and contributing to Twitter hashtags and Tweet chats of their choice, attending live webinars of their choice, and joining additional online communities related to their professional interests.

These are the directions provided to the students:

Now that you’ve added more online communities to your PLE, create a diagram to represent them.

  1. Create a PLE diagram of your online communities.  See examples PLE Diagrams at http://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/PLE+Diagrams.
  2. Represent at least 10 different online communities in your graphic and explicitly show…

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Student Perceptions of Online Group Work: What They Really Think and How to Make it Work

Online Learning Insights

This is the third post in a three-part series featuring strategies and skill development for instructors wanting to create, facilitate and encourage collaboration among students working in groups. This post identifies what students really think about group work—the three most significant barriers to working in online teams and strategies to help students overcome each.

Young Couple Sitting with a Pile of Books Success of the group learning process is dependent upon the target outcomes of the assignment and design of the collaboration activity

 “Working with other people on a real project can actually be a valuable learning experience. The problem is, if it’s mandated by school, and participants aren’t really interested or motivated, that’s not a “real project.”  If there was a way to facilitate projects that were relevant to participants’ interests, and perhaps some kind of meaningful output, that would likely result in a different kind of experience.” Student comment on the School Survival Forums [an uncensored forum…

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