Category Archives: Resources to learn Math

five days five quotes challenge – #3

The way to describe a first and last sentence in a piece of writing is just.too much!!
Again, in awe to Patt Thomson and her magnificent advise. I am getting there!

patter

So far so good with the quotations then. This one may seem bitdifferent at first – but then maybe you are starting to see a bit of a theme in my choices...

First sentences are promissory notes. Whether they foreshadowplot, sketch in character, establish mood, or jump-start arguments, the road ahead of them stretches invitingly and all things are, at least for the moment, possible. Last sentences are more contained in their possibilities. They can sum up, refuse to sum up, change the subject, leave you satisfied, leave you wanting more, put everything into perspective, or explode perspectives. They do have one advantage: they become the heirs of the interest that isgenerated by everything that precedes them; they don’t have to start the engine, all they have to do is shut it down. This means they often come across as elegiac: the reader is leaving something he or she…

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How did human beings acquire the ability to do math? with Keith Devlin

(October 29, 2012) Keith Devlin concludes the course by discussing the development of mathematical cognition in humans as well as the millennium problems

Calculus one of the most successful technologies, with Keith Devlin

The making of a mile of PI

What is creativity in maths?

This is a bit of a longer article I found in + Plus Magazine:

Where were your most creative experiences at school? In art class? In music? English? In your maths lesson? That last one might not be the obvious choice for many of us, unless you were lucky enough to have a really inspiring maths teacher. But that is exactly the type of opportunity we are hoping to create for maths students aged 7-16 as part of the project, Developing Mathematical Creativity, with our sister site, NRICH.

One aspect of the project that we are particularly excited about is highlighting the role of creativity in mathematics research. All mathematicians tell us that doing original mathematics is highly creative – but what exactly do they mean by that? We asked some researchers from a range of subjects about the role of creativity in their work.

Working within constraints

We started with David Berman who has a very interesting perspective on creativity. As well as being a theoretical physicist at Queen Mary, University of London, he also has a long standing collaboration with the Turner prize winning artist, Grenville Davey. Deconstructing the artistic idea of creativity, Berman told us that rather than an unbridled release of ideas where anything is possible, beauty comes from creating work withing very tight syntactic constraints. “Think of music: the tight system of key and chord makes music very constrained and yet capable of amazing emotional power,” he said. For example Schoenberg’s* experiments with atonal music, though completely new and boundary breaking, were far from unconstrained. “Maths is like this. There are enormous syntactic constrains but still enough freedom to say something new. The beauty lies in between the constraints of syntax and the freedom of meaning.”

Continue reading…

How the ancient Greeks shaped modern mathematics – video animation

How the ancient Greeks shaped modern mathematics – video animation

http://gu.com/p/3ne6d

Resources for studying math

IXL Math activities

The Center of Math: Videos Diferential Calculus

 

The Center produces free high-quality resources that include lecture, solution, tutorial and research videos.They are recorded in their studio classroom space in Cambridge, MA. You can easily browse courses and subjects here or on our youtube channel.

The full story of maths. Marcus de Sautoy – BBC four

Chapter 1: The language of the universe

Chapter 2: The genius of the east

Chapter 3: The forntiers of space

Chapter 4: To infinity and beyond

The role of the untrue in mathematics

Chandler Davis’s chapter. Part of the book The best writings on mathematics (William P. Thurston and Mircea Pitici)